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The History of the Lions of Georgia

Multiple District 18

In 1964 the Lions of Georgia created the position of State Historian to keep the historical records of the Lions of Georgia. The following articles were presented over the years as a report to the Lions of the history within the state of Georgia. Each year the District Governors are requested to submit a report of their service to the State Historian. Report of the State Historian is compiled by decade with the latest decade published, 1990-1999. Work is underway for the first decade of the 2000s.

Articles for this website are made possible by Past MD 18 State Historian Olin C. Newby PDG. Conversion to the Internet by Rick Mizell, PDG MD18 Information Technology Chairperson

Available Articles

1917 - 1948 1920 - 1954 1955 - 1956 1956 - 1957 1957 - 1958 1958 - 1959
1959 - 1960 1960 - 1961 1961 - 1962 1962 - 1963 1963 - 1964 1964 - 1965
1970 - 1980 1980 - 1990

History of the Nineties

     

 

A Chronology of Georgia Lions

1st club formed in Georgia, December 17, 1920 in Atlanta, Georgia

The following are the first Districts in Lionism, District 1 Illinois, District 2 Texas, District 3 Oklahoma, District 4 California, District 5 Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi and East Texas.

1921 District 18 is created with Alabama, Florida and Georgia.

1924 Alabama and Florida form new districts, Georgia remains in District 18, 15 clubs, 579 members.

1934 The position Deputy District Governor was created. This position was used to assist the District Governor.

1937 Georgia redistricts to MD 18 with 3 sub districts called 18 - A B C. The position Zone Chair is created.

1947 Georgia redistricts to 4 sub districts called 18 - A B C D

1948 Georgia Lighthouse (Now Georgia Lions Lighthouse Foundation) is formed. The first State Uniform was approved.

1949 The Past District Governors Association is organized.

1951 Recording for the Blind (Now Learning Ally) is formed.

1955 Georgia redistricts to 6 sub districts called 18 - A B C D E F. The District Governors Contest was created to foster club competition.

1963 Georgia Lions Eye Bank is formed.

1964 State Historian position is created. Eugene Sanders served as first State Historian.

1965 Council of Governors formed. State Secretary position is created. Alcee F. Maxwell was the first State Secretary.

1966 State Lion Tamer position is created. Rupert Gay served as first State Lion Tamer.

1968 Lions of Georgia sponsored the first Peach Bowl game in Atlanta for the benefit of the Georgia Lions Lighthouse Foundation.

1974 Lions Membership in Georgia peaked at 11,704

1976 M E R L is developed, Membership, Extension, Retention and Leadership. Georgia Lions adopt Leader Dogs for the Blind as a State Project.

1977 Council of Governors adopt the practice of wearing the Red Coat at official functions. Georgia Lions Camp for the Blind is Organized. The Peach is adopted as MD 18 symbol.

1986 Linda Selby becomes the current State Secretary.

1987 Number of Lions Clubs peak at 314, Women join Lionism.

1989 State Newsletter was started. The Region Chairman position is created.

1994 The position Vice District Governor was created. Was called Deputy District Governor

1995 Georgia redistricts, moving clubs from 18-D and 18-E to 18-F to redistribute membership.

1997 Georgia Lions Eye bank is no longer a Lions project. Children's Eyecare Center at Emory is created.

1999 Lion Jim Ervin becomes the first Lion from Georgia to serve as International President.

2004 Georgia Council of Blind Lions is formed.

2005 5 of 6 sub districts now below 1,250 members.

2006 District 18-D regains 1,250 plus briefly.

2009 The Position of Vice District Governor was revised to 1st and 2nd Vice District Governor.

2011 GLT GMT positions are created replacing M E R L. Global Leadership Team and Global Membership Team.

2013 Georgia redistricts to 4 sub districts called 18 - L I O N. .

Membership Statistics

 

Each year, Lions Clubs International publishes a club directory of all Lions clubs. 1st Vice District Governor Elect, Lion Chip Nedza (18-N) has been working with Lions International to reproduce the club directories of the Georgia Lions Clubs. Please note that while some clubs appear earlier than their current charter date. There have been clubs that are chartered and then lose their charter. Also there are clubs who have changed their names over the years. Other clubs suffer losses in membership and were suspended by LCI. They later rebuilt their membership and regained active status.

1920 - 1921 1921 - 1922 1922 - 1923 1923 - 1924 1924 - 1925 1925 - 1926 1926 - 1927 1927 - 1928 1928 - 1929 1929 - 1930
1930 - 1931 1931 - 1932 1932 - 1933 1933 - 1934 1934 - 1935 1935 - 1936 1936 - 1937 1937 - 1938 1938 - 1939 1939 - 1940
1940 - 1941 1941 - 1942 1942 - 1943 1943 - 1944 1944 - 1945 1945 - 1946 1946 - 1947 1947 - 1948 1948 - 1949 1949 - 1950
1950 - 1951 1951 - 1952 1952 - 1953 1953 - 1954 1954 - 1955 1955 - 1956 1956 - 1957 1957 - 1958 1958 - 1959 1959- 1960
1960 - 1961 1961 - 1962 1962 - 1963 1963 - 1964 1964 - 1965 1965 - 1966 1966 - 1967 1967 -1968 1968 - 1969 1969 - 1970
1970 - 1971 1971 - 1972 1972 - 1973 1973 - 1974 1974 - 1975 1975 - 1976 1976 - 1977 1977 - 1978 1978 - 1979 1979 - 1980
1980 - 1981 1981 - 1982 1982 - 1983 1983 - 1984 1984 - 1985 1985 - 1986 1986 - 1987 1987 - 1988 1988 - 1989 1989 - 1990
1990 - 1991 1991 - 1992 1992 - 1993 1993 - 1994 1994 - 1995 1995 - 1996 1996 - 1997 1997 - 1998 1998 - 1999 1999 - 2000
2000 - 2001 2001 - 2002 2002 - 2003 2003 - 2004 2004 - 2005 2005 - 2006 2006 - 2007 2007 - 2008 2008 - 2009 2009 - 2010
2010 - 2011 2011 - 2012 2012 - 2013 2013 - 2014            

Cancelled Clubs 1987 to Present

Lioness Clubs in Georgia

Leo Clubs in Georgia

Club Name Changes

Georgia Lions Pins

Georgia Lions Towels

LIONOTES

 

   Activities are the life-blood of a Lions club.  Without activities a club dries up: with activities it grows and prospers.  A Lions club to justify its existence and to deserve the name, LIONS CLUB, must do something to help unfortunate individuals, to improve its community and to assist its country.  Things to be done are on every hand if we have the energy to look for them and to go about doing them.

     Some of these activities require money.  A Lions club should not call upon its members for the money but should raise the necessary funds from the general public by worthwhile projects.   THE LION magazine will also show the latest money-raising plans of Lions clubs all over the country.

     Programs that are entertaining, interesting, instructive and inspiring are necessary if your club is to have good attendance and develop a spirit of Lionism.  By all means, at meeting should open with group singing, a salute to the flag and an invocation.  Much of the spirit of the meeting depends upon the tail-twister – he should go into action during the meal if possible and see that the crowd gets in a good humor.

     Speakers and entertainers for the program can often be found in your own club or in nearby Lions clubs – use them if possible.  Good speakers can be located among youth leaders and the clergy, in the legal, medical and educational professions; and in business establishments, factories and military posts.

     A group of busy people, giving up their time to attend a Lions club meeting, deserve a constructive program.

     Fellowship grows and expands through work and association.  Unless a Lion is actively engaged in doing something with other Lions, he does not get to know them well and does not develop a spirit of real fellowship.  Regular attendance is necessary also – a member who is weak in attendance never gets in the swim and feels like he is standing on the bank watching the other fellows have the fun. 

 

 

 

*Excerpted from “District Governors Annual Report to the Lions of Multiple District 18 Georgia” 1944-45”, page 10; by Percy Plant, Cabinet Secretary